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Stars of the Silver Screen: Jean Arthur & James Stewart (from "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington")


  

 
Price: $12.00
Estimated Shipping: $5.50
Category: Etc.
Item #: E01-0148-1018
Room: Library, Office, Study
Style: Famous Film Couple
Theme: Celebrity Memorabilia
Status: Previously Owned
Format: Photograph
Dimensions: 11"w x 8.5"h
Weight: 0.3 oz.


Product Description:

In celebration of American films, Dogbotz Boneyard is making available for purchase top-quality, mint-condition, glossy black-and-white photographic prints of well-renowned movie stars of the 1930s, ‘40s, ‘50s and early ‘60s. Each print comes in a clear document holder and is ready to be matted and/or framed.

Jean Arthur (October 17, 1900 – June 19, 1991) was an American actress and a major film star of the 1930s and 1940s. Arthur had feature roles in three Frank Capra films: Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), You Can't Take It With You (1938), and Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), films that championed the “everyday heroine.”

Arthur was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress in 1944 for her performance in The More the Merrier (1943). James Harvey wrote in his recounting of the era, “No one was more closely identified with the screwball comedy than Jean Arthur. So much was she part of it, so much was her star personality defined by it, that the screwball style itself seems almost unimaginable without her." Jean Arthur has been called “the quintessential comedic leading lady.”

Her last film performance was the memorable, and distinctly non-comedic, rancher’s wife in George Stevens’ Shane in 1953.

To the public, Arthur was known as a reclusive woman. News magazine Life observed in a 1940 article: “Next to Garbo, Jean Arthur is Hollywood’s reigning mystery woman.” As well as recoiling from interviews, she avoided photographers and refused to become a part of any kind of publicity.

James Maitland “Jimmy” Stewart (May 20, 1908 – July 2, 1997) was an American film and stage actor, known for his distinctive drawl voice and down-to-earth persona. Over the course of his career, he starred in many films widely considered classics. He was known for portraying the average American middle-class man, with everyday life struggles.

Stewart was nominated for five Academy Awards, winning one in competition and receiving one Lifetime Achievement award. Stewart was named the third greatest male screen legend in cinema history by the American Film Institute. He was a major Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer contract star. He also had a noted military career and was a World War II and Vietnam War veteran, who rose to the rank of Brigadier General in the United States Air Force Reserve.

The actor Cary Grant said of Stewart’s acting technique, “He had the ability to talk naturally. He knew that in conversations people do often interrupt one another and it's not always so easy to get a thought out. It took a little time for the sound men to get used to him, but he had an enormous impact. And then, some years later, Marlon {Brando} came out and did the same thing all over again — but what people forget is that Jimmy did it first.”

Throughout his seven decades in Hollywood, Stewart cultivated a versatile career and recognized screen image in such classics as Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, The Mortal Storm, The Philadelphia Story, Harvey, It’s a Wonderful Life, Shenandoah, Rear Window, Rope, The Man Who Knew Too Much, The Shop Around the Corner, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance and Vertigo. He is the most represented leading actor on the American Film Institute’s 100 Years…100 Movies (10th Anniversary Edition) and its lists. He is the most represented leading actor on the 100 Greatest Movies of All Time list presented by Entertainment Weekly. As of 2007, ten of his films have been inducted into the United States National Film Registry.

Though never on- or off-screen romantic partners, Jean Arthur and James Stewart are considered one of the most endearing couples of the 1930s due to their co-starring roles in 1939’s Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, considered one of the best political statements of the era. Stewart’s filibustering scene along with Arthur’s rallying support for his character’s cause is simply iconic.




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