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Dogbotz Sale Item

Stars of the Silver Screen: Rita Hayworth (from "Gilda")


  

 
Original Price:
Discount Price:
$12.00
$10.00
Estimated Shipping: $5.50
Category: Etc.
Item #: E01-0156-0218
Room: Library, Office, Study
Style: Actress
Theme: Celebrity Memorabilia
Status: Previously Owned
Format: Photograph
Dimensions: 8.5"w x 11"h
Weight: 0.3 oz.


Product Description:

In celebration of American films, Dogbotz Boneyard is making available for purchase top-quality, mint-condition, glossy black-and-white photographic prints of well-renowned movie stars of the 1930s, ‘40s, ‘50s and early ‘60s. Each print comes in a clear document holder and is ready to be matted and/or framed.

Rita Hayworth (born Margarita Carmen Cansino; October 17, 1918 – May 14, 1987) was an American actress and dancer. She achieved fame during the 1940s as one of the era’s top stars, appearing in a total of 61 films over 37 years. She is perhaps best known for her performance in the 1946 film noir Gilda. She is listed as one of the top 25 female motion picture stars of all time in the American Film Institute’s survey, AFI's 100 Years...100 Stars.

In 1927, her father took the family to Hollywood. He believed that dancing could be featured in the movies and that his family could be part of it. He established his own dance studio, where he taught such stars as James Cagney and Jean Harlow. During the Great Depression, he lost all his investments as commercial interest in his dancing classes waned.

During her time at Fox, Hayworth appeared in five pictures in non-notable roles. By the end of her six-month contract, Fox had merged into 20th Century Fox, with Darryl F. Zanuck serving as the executive producer. Zanuck did not renew Hayworth’s contract. Feeling that she had screen potential, the salesman and promoter, Edward C. Judson, whom she would marry in 1936, got her the lead roles in several independent films and arranged a screen test with Columbia Pictures. The studio head, Harry Cohn, signed Hayworth to a long-term contract and cast her in small roles in Columbia features.

In 1944, Hayworth made one of her best-known films, the Technicolor musical Cover Girl (1944) with Gene Kelly. The film established her as Columbia’s top star of the 1940s and gave her the distinction of being the first of only six women to dance on screen with both Kelly and Fred Astaire. “I guess the only jewels of my life,” Hayworth said in 1970, “were the pictures I made with Fred Astaire. And Cover Girl, too.”

For three consecutive years, starting in 1944, Hayworth was named one of the top movie box-office attractions in the world. She was adept in ballet, tap, ballroom, and Spanish routines.

Cohn continued to showcase Hayworth’s dance talents. Columbia featured her in the Technicolor films: Tonight and Every Night (1945) with Lee Bowman; and Down to Earth (1947) with Larry Parks.

Her sexy, glamorous appeal, was most noted in Charles Vidor’s film noir Gilda (1946) with Glenn Ford, which caused censors some consternation. The role, in which Hayworth wore black satin and performed a legendary one-glove striptease, “Put The Blame On Mame,” made her into a cultural icon as a femme fatale.

Later in life, Hayworth was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in 1980. The following year she moved to Manhattan, New York, where her daughter, Princess Yasmin Aga Khan, could care for her. Hayworth died at her home from complications associated with Alzheimer's on May 14, 1987, at age 68.




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